CALAGONONE JAZZ II INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL

ANPHITEATHER P.TICCA 18 / 19 / 20 JULY 1989 CALA GONONE - DORGALI (NU)

  • PROIEZIONE DEL FILM ” BIRD “;

Regia BRUCE WEBER

Dibattito e conferenza con il pubblico.

  • PROIEZIONE DEL FILM SU CHET BAKER “LET’S GET LOST”;

                 Dibattito e conferenza con il pubblico.

Omaggio a Chet Becker con FLAVIO BOLTRO (tromba)

  • ANTONELLO SALIS PER SOLO PIANOFORTE E FISARMONICA;
  • ANTONIO DORO “Sei la vita e la morte”

Su C.PAVESE con la partecipazione di Sara Stowe (soprano), Battista Giordano, Paolo Fresu, Antonietta Chironi, Angiola Serra, Paola puggioni e i Tenores di Dorgali.

  • ANTONIO DORO “…di bandiere, d’occhi, di cuori!”

Produzione originale su Majakovskij con:

Sara Stowe (soprano), Tenores di Dorgali (coro), S. Grandi (clarinetto), Paolo Fresu (tromba e ft.), Battista Giordano (chitarra), G. Usai (percussioni), P. Salotto (direttore)

  • YELLOW JACKETS IN CONCERTO.

Russell Ferrante (piano-keyboards), Jimmy Hoslip (bass Guitar), Marc Russo (saxophones), William Kennedy (drums)

  • BIG JAZZ BAND “PAOLO NONNIS” IN CONCERTO.

JULY 17 SCREENING OF THE FILM BIRD BY CLINT EASTWOOD

The film, which tells the story of Charlie “Bird” Parker, saxophonist, genius of jazz, with another great as Dizzy Gillespie, be-bop’s initiator and with the white trumpeter Red Rodney, is built as a collage of scenes from life of Parker, from his childhood in Kansas, through his marriage to Chan Richardson, to his untimely death at the age of thirty-four. Alongside the loves gone, Parker crosses rivers of alcohol and drugs that will devastate him. He will die only thirty-four years in poverty, but he will be remembered as one of the greatest jazz musicians in history.

JULY 18 SCREENING OF THE FILM LET'S GET LOST BY BRUCE WEBER WITH CHAT BACKER

A group of Baker fans, ranging from ex-associates to ex-wives and children, talk about the man. Weber’s film traces the man’s career from the 1950s, playing with jazz greats like Charlie Parker, Gerry Mulligan, and Russ Freeman, to the 1980s, when his heroin addiction and domestic indifference kept him in Europe. By juxtaposing these two decades, Weber presents a sharp contrast between the younger, handsome Baker — the statuesque idol who resembled a mix of James Dean and Jack Kerouac — to what he became, “a seamy looking drugstore cowboy-cum-derelict”, as J. Hoberman put it in his Village Voice review.[2]

Let’s Get Lost begins near the end of Baker’s life, on the beaches of Santa Monica, and ends at the Cannes Film Festival. Weber uses these moments in the present as bookends to the historic footage contained in the bulk of the film. The documentation ranges from vintage photographs by William Claxton in 1953 to appearances on The Steve Allen Show and kitschy, low budget Italian films Baker did for quick money.

 

GALLERY

GINO CRISPONI © PHOTOS